DPZ-Homepage
Menu mobile menu

Primaten at the DPZ

Currently, the DPZ´s Primate Husbandry Unit houses approximately 1300 animals from seven different species. They are used both for research at the DPZ and at other scientific institutions. The majority of the primates are kept in breeding colonies.

Rhesus macaque

Rhesus macaque in an enclosure at the DPZ. Photo: Anton Säckl

Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) are kept in breeding groups and as laboratory animals. With approximately 700 animals, it is the largest breeding colony at the DPZ. The breeding groups are mainly of Indian origin, offspring of a group imported from the Caribbean island of Cayo Santiago. At the DPZ, rhesus macaques serve as animal models for infection research and neuroscience.

To the rhesus macaques

Common marmosets

Common marmosets in their enclosure at the DPZ. Photo: Anton Säckl

With approximately 450 animals the common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) constitute the second largest primate colony at the DPZ, as well as the world´s largest breeding group. The breeding success of the Primate Husbandry Unit ensures that the in-house demand for laboratory animals is covered. Additionally, other publicly funded research institutons are provided with laboratory animals. At the DPZ, common marmosets serve as animal models for research on respiratory diseases, orthopox virus as well as in the field of stem cell research and auditory neuroscience.

To the common marmosets

Long-tailed macaques

Macaca fascicularis in a breeding group at the German Primate Center. Photo: Anton Säckl

The long-tailed macaques, or cynomolgous monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) represent a smaller population at the DPZ. Currently, a group of 60 animals is used by the Cognitive Ethology Laboratory for a variety of behavioral studies.

More about cynomolgous monkeys

Hamadryas baboons

Hamadryas baboons grooming in the outdoor enclosure at the DPZ. Photo: Anton Säckl

At the DPZ, a breeding group with hamadryas baboons is kept (Papio hamadryas) since 1980. Because of their social structure, baboons can be easily bred. At the DPZ, there is currently no biomedical research with hamadryas baboons. The approximately 25 animals are kept, to cover the scientific needs of baboons in Germany. Hamadryas baboons are used as model organisms for research of epilepsy and schizophrenia, as well as for the study of immune responses in organ transplants.

To the hamadryas baboons

Ring-tailed lemurs

Ring-tailed lemurs in the outdoor enclosure at the DPZ. Photo: Margit Hampe

The ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) are one of three lemur species kept and bred at the DPZ. The lemurs are used within the framework of their research in the Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology Unit . The DPZ maintains a research station in Madagascar, where the scientists observe and study the monkeys in their natural habitat.

To the Ring-tailed lemurs

Black-and-white ruffed lemurs

A black-and-white ruffed lemur at the DPZ. Photo: Anton Säckl

The black-and-white ruffed lemur (Varecia variegata) is the second major lemur species kept at the DPZ. The beautiful animals with thick black and white colored fur as well as the other species of lemurs (ring-tailed lemurs and mouse lemurs) are used for behavioral research at the DPZ.

More about black-and-white ruffed lemurs

Gray mouse lemurs

A three-week-old gray mouse lemur in an artificial nest box. Photo: Elise Huchard

The gray mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus) is a small lemur species and like all mouse lemurs, it is a nocturnal arboreal primate. The mouse lemurs are kept at the DPZ in an animal house where it is possible to shift the day and night cycle by 12 hours. Similarly to the night houses in zoological gardens, these nocturnal lemur species can be observed during the day.

More about gray mouse lemurs


Contact

Dipl. Biol. Uwe Schönmann Colony Manager +49 551 3851 230 +49 551 3851 251 Contact

Annette Husung Deputy Colony Management +49 551 3851-363 +49 551 3851-251 Contact

The interactive tour guides the visitors to the husbandry and breeding facilities of the DPZ and provides a lot of information about monkey species, hygiene regulations and the daily work of veterinarians, animal caretakers and scientists.

To the tour