DPZ-Homepage
Menu mobile menu

Figures of animals used for scientific purposes in Germany

An often misunderstood aspect in the public discussion on animal experiments in research, are the official numbers of experimental animals issued by the Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture. In Germany, all experiments on vertebrates must be approved and the number of animals must be reported to the responsible state authorities. The ministry publishes the figures annually. The latest figures are from 2018 and were published on 18 December 2019.

In recent years, media and animal research critics have generally confined themselves to pointing out the higher total number of animals. However, the ministry covers many different types of operations and only a glance at the details, makes it possible to fully understand the animal research totals for Germany. In addition, the comparison of experimental animal numbers with other areas of animal use in Germany (for example, food production) helps to understand the relationship between animal experiments and animal consumption. The following will help you find the answer to the questions:

Animal figures - no permanent increase

Old world monkeys like these rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) are for instance used for HIV-research and neurosciences at the DPZ. Photo: Karin Tilch
Old world monkeys like these rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) are for instance used for HIV-research and neurosciences at the DPZ. Photo: Karin Tilch

In Germany all experiments with vertebrates must be approved and the number of animals must be reported to the relevant authorities. However, in Germany this figure is only a part of the annual numbers of experimental animals. For animal tests in the scientific sense, interventions are made to manufacture products, substances or organisms, for training purposes or the removal of tissues or organs for use in alternative methods.

Statistics for 2009 to 2018 shows that the numbers of test animals used in Germany are subject to only a slight fluctuation (Figure 1). Over the past nine years between 2,7 and 3 million animals have been used annually. In 2018, 2,825,066 animals were used for scientific purposes. Included in this count are 2,138,714 animals used in animal experiments and 686,352 animals that have been euthanised for scientific purposes without experimental intervention, i. e. used to obtain cells for cell culture, for example. The proportion of all animal experiments attributed to basic research in 2018 was 937,756 (44 per cent). Mice, rats and fish continue to be by far the most frequently used laboratory animals, accounting for 93 per cent of the total. With a total number of 3,324 animals, the use of non-human primates decreased in 2018 compared to the previous year (3,513), but this fluctuation is within the range of deviations in the past. This is due to the use of primates for statutory safety testing of potential drugs and other substances. The number of dogs and cats has increased slightly, while the number of birds and fish has decreased. The number of rabbits and farm animals has remained almost constant (Figure 2).

Figure 1: Comparison of the experimental animal numbers from 2009 until 2018. Source: Versuchstierzahlen 2009-2018, BMEL. Graphics: German Primate Center / Sylvia Ranneberg
Figure 1: Comparison of the experimental animal numbers from 2009 until 2018. Source: Versuchstierzahlen 2009-2018, BMEL. Graphics: German Primate Center / Sylvia Ranneberg

Due to the adjustment of the German Animal Protection Law to the EU directive on the protection of animals used for scientific purposes, the counting method of animals has changed in 2014. Up to and including 2013, those animals were recorded at the start of an experiment and since 2014 the animals had to be reported upon completion of the experiment. As a result, some animals are counted twice or even three times during the transition time. The number of transgenic animals has also changed. Breeding animals are now partially counted. This reflects a higher number of animals, even though more animals were not used in the experiments. Another difference concerns the non-invasive investigations such as behavioral studies. In certain federal states these are now included in the total number of experiments.

Of all the counted experiments, also included those that are less stressful: For example, it must be reported if blood is taken from a rhesus macaque at the DPZ. The process is performed under anesthesia and the animal does not suffer permanent harm.

Figure 2: Proportion of different animal groups in the experimental animals in 2018. Image: Tierversuche verstehen
Figure 2: Proportion of different animal groups in the experimental animals in 2018. Image: Tierversuche verstehen

The moderate decline in the number of laboratory animals used in biomedical research, which continues to grow, shows that biomedical research is becoming increasingly economical with laboratory animals. It contributes to a constantly growing field of research with a decreasing proportion of laboratory animals. For example, federal spending on health research alone has risen by an average of around 6 percent each year since 2010, most recently to 2.51 billion euros in 2018 (Federal Report on Research and Innovation 2018).

One reason for this is the internationally recognized 3Rs principle for reducing experiments to a necessary minimum. This ethical principle is practised daily in science, which is also reflected in the stable number of laboratory animals as the scope of research increases (Figure 3).

Figure 3: Comparison of experimental animal numbers and federal expenditure on health research from 2009 to 2018. Graph: Tierversuche verstehen
Figure 3: Comparison of experimental animal numbers and federal expenditure on health research from 2009 to 2018. Graph: Tierversuche verstehen

Non-human primates - only a thousandth of experimental animals

Nonhuman primates represent less than one-thousandth of all research animals in Germany (in 2018 it was a total of 3,324). They are used only in experiments of greater scientific importance and only if there is neither an alternative method nor the possibility of carrying out the experiment with less developed species.

Nonhuman primates are also used to study serious diseases, to test medical product development, or to test the safety of drugs, ingredients or medical products.

The basic research accounts for only 5 per cent of the total (177 animals, see Figure 4). 84 per cent of these non-human primates used in Germany (2,755) are used because legislators prescribe it: they are used for toxicity tests or other safety assessment of products used by humans. Such tests are not part of the research at the German Primate Center.

Figure 4: Animal research with non-human primates divided by intended purpose. Source: Versuchstierzahlen 2018, BMEL. Image: German Primate Center, Sylvia Ranneberg
Figure 4: Animal research with non-human primates divided by intended purpose. Source: Versuchstierzahlen 2018, BMEL. Image: German Primate Center, Sylvia Ranneberg

Experimental animal numbers at the DPZ

The photo shows a common marmoset.
New world monkeys like this common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) are bred for stem cell research and infection research at the DPZ. Photo: Anton Säckl

The numbers of non-human primates (both old world and new world) in basic biological research at the German Primate Center, varies from year to year. Generally, the figures in the past few years have been around 100 to 250 animals. As of December 31st 2019, 107 monkeys were in experiments at the DPZ. Because of the different research projects from the institute's wide range of topics, this is a necessity. They were, for example, infection research projects (for example HIV vaccines) as well as from neurosciences (development of neuroprosthetics) and reproductive research.

Comparing experimental animal numbers with the number of animals used for other purposes

If the approximately 2.8 million scientific interventions on vertebrates are compared to the annual meat production in Germany, the animals killed in the hunt (see Figure 5), the figures are quickly brought into perspective.

Figure 5: In Germany, animals are used for a variety of purposes. Source BMEL, Deutscher Jagdverband, Eurostat, Statistisches Bundesamt. Figure: German Primate Center / Sylvia Ranneberg
Figure 5: In Germany, animals are used for a variety of purposes. Source BMEL, Deutscher Jagdverband, Eurostat, Statistisches Bundesamt. Figure: German Primate Center / Sylvia Ranneberg

Figures of experimental animals compared to other figures of animal usage

According to the Federal Office for Statistics (Destatis), more than 58 million pigs, cattle, sheep, etc. and over 700 million poultry were slaughtered in Germany in 2018. In the course of a lifetime, each German eats an average of 700 chickens but only two mice are used for biomedical research. On a purely statistical level, in the course of one’s life, a total of 0.0017 non-human primates would be used in experiments.

The number of nonhuman primates used for research purposes, is far less than the number of animals killed in everyday road traffic in Germany: the official number of accidents with wild boars or deers, collected by the German hunting association amounted in 2017/2018 to over 233,000 animals - the estimated dark figure of 1 million animals is much higher. Not all accidents are reported and accidents involving animals such as rabbits, rodents and birds are not considered part of the statistic.

Sources for the numbers:

Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture (German)

Federal Office for Statistics

German Hunters Association (German)

European Union Office for Statistics (Eurostat)

Links

An association of scientists who provide information on the topic of animal experiments in science and current developments

University of Hohenheim website on animal experiments and animal protection

Logo of the Max Delbrück Center

Current number of animals used for scientific purposes at the MDC Max-Delbrück-Center for Molecular Medicine in Berlin.